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and the work of the civil rights activist in the 1960s. and thomas mann and norm ornstein on their book of partisanship in congress. >> the tension builds in one of the things that happens during that time is that a soviet submarine is found by american ships. and there are charges on a soviet submarine. a knock out the electrical system. the carbon dioxide is rising. people are passing out inside the submarine. they have no communication with the commander. the commander loads the torpedo, the war started already in the war is starting. they want to launch the nuclear torpedo. fortunately, one of the other commanders on the ship from a lower rank talked him out of it. it might have saved the world. >> of this is so close to the edge. it really was one of the scariest moments after this. >> they said we didn't notice. honestly, we were teenagers. my god, we wouldn't even be here to talk. >> director oliver stone and peter koznick of the untold history of united states senator nunn on 10:00 p.m. eastern on booktv's "after words." part of four days of nonfiction authors and books through
disputes. things like the civil rights fights of the 1960s. now it is routine. it requires really 60 votes to do anything in the senate. we have this intense level of party line voting with the filibuster. it's like a parliament system without majority rule. then you have the informal analog to that in the house which the majority party says, we're not going to bring anything up. it has to have 218 votes but it has to have a majority of the majority which gives a veto to the republican wing of the conservative party. that's where we'restick stuck right now. >> let's bring in lisa dejardan. is there in this particular case -- >> reporter: i'm hesitant to get into it because it gets into senate procedure. the simplest would be if the leaders agree not to invoke that 60-vote requirement. if they agree a majority would be enough. for that to work, the rest of the senate would then have to essentially allow it to. there would have to be no one that attempts a filibuster. that's the easiest way to get around the 60 votes. another way is to possibly use some sort of budget measure that could be p
sectarian civil war. we're talking a time frame of years. right now, jon, the death toll is about 45,000. a lot of people are saying that number could easily double in the coming months and years as this violence continues, jon. jon: the refugees keep streaming out of that war-torn country. leland vittert in jerusalem for us. leland, thank you. harris: new information from russia today where president vladmir putin has signed that bill banning americans from adopting russian children. we saw this coming and now it has happened. the bill angering americans and russians who say it victimizes the children just to make a political point. amy kellogg is live for us in london with more. amy, why have they passed this law? >> reporter: well, harris, the law is named after dima yakovlev, a toddler who died in the custody of his adoptive american parents a few years ago in the washington, d.c. area. he was left in a car in the heat but basically, it does appear that this law was actually a reaction to a law passed in the united states. it puts travel bans, visa bans and asset freezes on 60 ru
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3